York Science & Innovation Grand Tour May - Sept 2012

Sponsored by Aviva

01 Blake Street

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Shells of pollen and spores can help preserve and deliver medicines, food supplements and cosmetics, enabled by patented Sporomex technology.

02 Blake Street

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One AERO® bar has approximately 20,000 tiny air bubbles trapped in delicious chocolate. It has been scientifically shown that the addition of tiny bubbles in chocolate increases the flavour and en...

03 St. Helen's Square

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Airspeed Ltd was established in Piccadilly, York in 1931 to build aeroplanes including this, the AS.4 Ferry, designed by A. H. Tiltman and Nevil Shute the famous writer.

04 Davygate

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York plant biologists, funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, have developed new varieties of a medicinal plant that cures the killer disease malaria.

05 Davygate

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An innovative York company’s microwave technology plays a key role in protecting military personnel and bringing major sporting events and news to your TV screen.

06 Coney Street

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York-based Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine supports thousands of medical physicists, clinical engineers and technologists working with medical imaging scanners like this one.

07 Coney Street

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York College has helped more than 6,500 local people to enhance the worlds of science, technology and innovation over the last five years.

08 Spurriergate

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The Aviva Athletics Academy provides the opportunity for every child in the country to stay healthy and active and to get involved in athletics.

09 High Ousegate

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The National Railway Museum showcases innovations from over 200 years of railways. Expect the unexpected, like this view of the museum photographed through a bubble.

10 High Ousegate

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Scientists from Flamingo Land Resort are conserving species in Africa, that visitors and schools can learn about at the visitor attraction near to York.

11 Piccadilly

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Nuclear physicists at the University of York recreate the spectacular conditions of exploding stars like supernovae to explore the origins of heavy elements.

12 Piccadilly

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Thermal imaging is used in the care of animals at Flamingo Land Resort, home to the UK’s favourite theme park and conservation zoo near York.

13 Piccadilly

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University of York scientists use cutting edge 4-Dimensional imaging technologies to understand how your immune system works.

14 Coppergate Centre

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Many liquid crystals, like those pictured here, were developed by scientists based in Yorkshire; they have the potential to be used in applications such as high definition TV screens.

15 Coppergate Centre

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HIV vaccine trials in York may offer hope to the global pandemic, in which more than 7,000 people are infected every day.

16 Coppergate Centre

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The world’s steepest, record-breaking roller coaster, ‘Mumbo Jumbo’, overlooks the UK’s favourite zoo at Flamingo Land Resort near York.

17 Coppergate Centre

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Donald Shepherd invented the first Portakabin building in York over 50 years ago and Portakabin is now a UK SuperBrand.

18 Coppergate Centre

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The vital flow of BP North Sea oil and gas is displayed and monitored via 40 high definition videoconferencing systems, installed on drilling platforms and onshore by York-based Saville Audio Visual.

19 Castlegate

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10 hectares of racecourse, 360,000 racegoers a year and 1500 thoroughbreds a year require many innovations including green solutions, labour saving devices and scientific advances, for the award w...

20 Castlegate

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Henry Hindley was an 18th century clockmaker and maker of precision scientific instruments who lived in York. His work influenced the development of astronomical instrumentation.

21 South Esplanade

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Ground-breaking 21st Century technology, in the form of a ‘bionic skeleton’, is being used to safeguard the East End of York Minster, a masterpiece of medieval technology.

22 King's Staith

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Images like this one of Mexico’s Yucatan Peninsula are among the European Space Agency resources used by the York-based UK Space Education Office ESERO-UK.

23 Ouse Bridge, King's Staith

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University of York researchers have used the iconic Tansy beetle to explore important ecological processes and to establish a model system for future insect conservation.

24 Micklegate

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John Snow, born in North Street, York in 1813, pioneer in anaesthesia and ‘father of epidemiology’, was recently voted ‘greatest doctor ever’.

25 Micklegate Bar

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This image of Micklegate Bar was produced using a Leica C10 laser scanner which is capable of recording 50,000 points of data per second at a range of 300 metres.

26 Station Road

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The total number of miles travelled by the fleet of East Coast trains per weekday is equal to one train travelling more than one and half times around the world.

27 Station Rise

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A notable species of flying insect recorded by researchers at the Nature of Flight area at the Yorkshire Air Museum is Nigrotipula nigra, commonly known as the Chocolate Crane Fly.

28 Museum Gardens

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University of York AudioLab researchers are using the latest 3-D audio modelling technology to recreate the sound of 16th century choral voices in the Abbey ruins.

29 Hospitium, Museum Gardens

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The Institution of Engineering and Technology has more than 150,000 members in 127 countries; the York region is represented by the North Yorkshire Local Network.

30 Observatory, Museum Gardens

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The astronomer William Parsons, born in York in 1800, was the first to discover the billions of stars outside our own galaxy, the Milky Way.

31 Observatory, Museum Gardens

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York was home to one of the pioneers of modern volcanology, Dr Tempest Anderson (1846-1913). He travelled the world to study and photograph erupting volcanoes and their devastating aftermath.

32 Observatory, Museum Gardens

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York man Thomas Cooke built the 4 inch refractor telescope inside this observatory in 1850 and he went on to make the then-largest telescope in the world.

33 Museum Gardens

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In 1683 Martin Lister was the first archaeologist to determine that the Multangular Tower, here in Museum Gardens, was of Roman origin by measuring the sizes of the bricks.

34 The Lodge, Museum Gardens

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Sir George Cayley (1773-1857), ‘Father of Aeronautics’, first realised the forces involved in heavier-than-air flight, paving the way to modern aeroplane wing construction.

35 Lendal

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York St John staff and students work in a number of innovative ways to bring the creative industries together with the worlds of business, science and technology in the city and beyond.

36 Museum Street

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York based Merisis Technology Ltd has helped you have your cake and eat it! Merisis has developed software for bakery suppliers to car importers, furniture manufacturers to whisky distillers.

37 High Petergate

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Colouring agents used by medieval glaziers to create stained glass windows in York Minster have been found to contain tiny gold and silver fragments now known as nanoparticles.

38 High Petergate

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The National Science Learning Centre and National STEM Centre in York ensure that teachers have the skills and resources required to prepare young people for future career opportunities.

39 High Petergate

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Fractals, like this Mandelbrot plot, are self-repeating patterns found throughout nature, in plants, lightning and even coastlines. Early work on fractals was pioneered by Lewis Fry Richardson, wh...

40 High Petergate

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Nestlé uses only natural colouring foodstuffs such as Red Cabbage in SMARTIES® and explores innovative technologies to make sure they keep their bright colours.

41 Grape Lane

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Scientists in York are developing new drugs and vaccines to combat some of the world’s most deadly tropical diseases caused by microscopic organisms.

42 Grape Lane

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Viruses, like this Pariacoto Virus, have the same geometric structure as a football and obey the same mathematical rules of symmetry.

43 St. Sampson's Parish Church Annexe

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This image is of one of a number of experiments testing fusion which has the potential to provide an almost limitless source of energy; York physicists are developing ways to harness it.

44 Newgate Market

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KITKAT® wafers are specially baked to have a similar structure to plane wings and steel beams, which makes KITKAT® so crispy and light.

45 Newgate Market

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Neurobiologists at the University of York use fruit flies and cultured brain cells to study learning and dementia.

46 Shambles

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Aviva works with University of York students to create innovative advertising workshops where their industry expertise inspires local school children to produce their own TV adverts.

47 Shambles

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York companies have provided the NHS in Wales with a ground-breaking new way to care for the planet as well as its patients.

48 Fossgate

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Every year 350 York St John University new graduates teach science to over 12,000 pupils.

49 Deangate

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York St John is reaching out to 70 different countries with its expertise in business innovation and change.

50 Minster Yard

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World-leading researchers in the Department of Electronics are developing natural-sounding synthesised speech for people who have lost the use of their vocal cords.

51 Chapter House Street

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Variable stars, such as these pictured, were first measured by the 18th century York astronomer, John Goodricke, when he was just a teenager.

52 Monk Bar

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Enzymes found in the wood-boring isopod, the gribble, could hold the key to converting wood and straw into liquid biofuels.

53 Monk Bar

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York scientists are developing novel ways to fight bacterial disease and to exploit these microscopic organisms to improve our environment.

54 St Maurice's Road

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State-of-the-art equipment and expertise at the University of York’s Bioscience Technology Facility enable York scientists to work at the forefront of their specialist research area.

55 Lord Mayor's Walk

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York St John has been delivering innovative education and training since 1841.

56 Clarence Street

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Every year York St John University’s ‘CREATE ‘ graduate show brings new innovation and creativity to York.

57 Bootham Tower

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Sir Clifford Allbutt, a past pupil of St Peter’s School and an exceptionally fine physician, scientist, teacher and scholar, invented the modern short clinical thermometer in 1866.

58 Bootham Bar

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York scientists were the first to create human bladder tissue in the laboratory and this is now being used to find new treatments for bladder diseases including cancer.

59 St Leonard's Place

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Using quantum physics, York trumpet-maker Richard Smith, has designed the State Fanfare trumpets to announce the Queen’s arrival at her Diamond Jubilee celebrations and the opening of the Olympics.

60 St Leonard's Place

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York scientists were the first to isolate prostate cancer stem cells allowing them to explore why they are more resistant to treatment than other cancer cells.

Exhibit Location

Although no longer available to actually view in their city locations, you can click on the ‘Show exhibit on map’ link to see where sponsor images were located, or view Tour Guide for larger map.

Jump to Exhibits

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